Author archives: John Hsieh

Regular Bedtime Equals Happy Kids

Regular Bedtime Equals Happy Kids

Mother Knows Best - Millennium Cohort Study

A recent study published in the American Academy of Pediatrics journal, Pediatrics, highlighted an association between the regularity of children’s bedtimes and the prevalence of behavior problems. Specifically, children who did not have regular bedtimes had worse behavioral scores, as rated by their mothers and teachers. The study was an analysis of data from the UK Millennium Cohort study (MCS), a longitudinal population based study on children similar to the landmark US Cardiology study, the Framingham Heart Study (FHS). The study drew from interviews of mothers of 10,230 children, which is twice ...

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CurbsideMe Android app is here

CurbsideMe Android app is here

Ask. Answer. Learn. On the Go!

We are very excited to announce the arrival of the CurbsideMe mobile app for Android devices to the Google Play app store.

Download the app now and ask your clinical questions or answer your peers' questions on the go. 

For those with an iOS device (e.g. iPhone or iPad), your version of the mobile app is coming VERY soon! Stay tuned. Thank you for your patience.

Any feedback you have will be greatly appreciated.

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CurbsidePoetry: comforting the comforter

CurbsidePoetry: comforting the comforter

The Diagnosis

The edge of darkness conversely is the brink of light
Here I stand frozen with fright on the verge of hope
What should frighten and what should I fear?
When all the worry and the storm’s fury
Dissipates with you here…

Amish Dangodara, M.D.

***
Author's Reflections
A patient comforted me at seeing my obvious discomfort in giving her bad news. She reminded me that what she had to confront, good or bad, could not be changed; all she needed was someone to guide her through the road ahead.

***

(photo credit: Munch und Warnemünde 1907-1908)

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Lessons Learned

(a tribute to all the new interns and the patients who educate them)

There is always an exception to a rule. Even a wise and inviolable rule such as “the only reasons not to do a digital rectal exam is if you don’t have fingers or the patient does not have an anus.” I learned this lesson and many others like it the hard way during my memorable year as a medical intern.

Late one on-call night, a middle aged man rolls into the coronary care unit on a gurney.

“Our chest pain admission is here. You’re up ...

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